After Declaring War, Anonymous Takes Down ISIS Website, Replaces It With Viagra Ad

A group connected with Anonymous has hacked into an ISIS supporting site, and replaced it with a message to calm down and an ad for an online drug store.

via: Twitter

ISIS sites were been moved to un discoverable places recently but Ghost Sec, a hacking group related to anonymous took control of website and it is replaced with message telling the visitors that there were “too much isis”.
“Enhance your calm,” the full message read. “Too many people are into this ISIS-stuff. Please gaze upon this lovely ad so we can upgrade our infrastructure to give you ISIS content you all so desperately crave.”

via : Lloydspharmacy

The ad which connected to an online drug store where payment can be made in bitcoin, and which seems added by the hacking group would allows visitors to navigate by online drugs, including Prozac and Viagra.
Prior to the site was brought down, it was comprehended to be one of various destinations that were sharing and replicating ISIS purposeful publicity with the goal that it could maintain a strategic distance from discovery and being closed down. Numerous such informal destinations have been made on the dark web, as indicated by security blogger Scot Terban, however an expansive number of them seem, by all accounts, to be informal and largely disorganised attempts.

via : Daily Express

As indicated by a few bloggers, ISIS supporters have been hoping to move their purposeful publicity locales onto the dark web in light of the fact that they are less inclined to be found and close down. It is hazy how nearly related the webpage and the gathering are, with a lot of its online action being finished by individuals who are subsidiary with ISIS instead of specifically connected with the gathering.

Isis supporters have been found to transfer sites on to the dark web, the part of the web made up of pages that are not publicly accessible and often require users to be using tools that provide anonymity.

Since the Paris assaults recently, groups connected with Anonymous have started their “war” with ISIS sympathizers on the web. Assaults as a component of the battle have included spam assaults and reporting Twitter accounts, and also more refined hacking.

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